In 1937 Willa Beatrice Brown earned a commercial pilot’s license in the United States. She and her husband, Cornelius Coffey, organized a fully accredited flying school providing basic through advanced flight instruction for men and women. Willa was the organizing force in the creation of the National Airmen Association, whose mission was to lobby Congress for the integration of the Army Air Corps. Her efforts were directly responsible for the creation of the renowned Tuskegee Airmen, which led to the integration of the US military services in 1948. This documentary tells the story of early black aviation and the extraordinary individuals who shaped this part of civil rights history.
 
CREDITS
Severo Perez: Producer, Writer, Director, Editor
Virgil Harper: Director of Photography
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The written alphabet has evolved from ancient quill point calligraphy to modern day cursive handwriting. The film relates how historical events, the printing press and mass-produced pen points determined the shape of the letters. Dazzling illuminated manuscripts and ancient illustrations come to life to tell the story.      
 
CREDITS
Severo Perez: Producer
Judith Schiffer Perez, ED.D: Writer
Mallory Pearce: Designer, animator
 
BACK TO TOP A naïve young reporter interrupts Mark Twain's game of pool one afternoon to interview the famous author about his life and work. Mark Twain has fun with the lad and relates a story about the "bettin'est man and the jumpin'est frog in the whole of Calaveras County."   Animation and Live action.

AWARDS
CINE GOLD EAGLE CINE
SILVER AWARD Houston International Film Festival
SILVER MEDAL Virgin Island Film Festival
  

CREDITS
Severo Perez: Producer
Ellen Geer: Writer, adapted short story
Dan Bessie: Director
Mallory Pearce: Designer, animator
Bill Davis: Designer, animator
Ernie Lieberman: Composer
Wayne Heffley: Actor
 
 
BACK TO TOP A serape maker, a potter, and a rope maker in a small Mexican village are featured as they take their goods to the weekly market day. The film demonstrates how people are dependent on one another's skills to meet their basic needs. Starting before sunrise, vendors set up their stalls in established areas in Ocotlan, Oaxaca. Here all the rules of commerce apply: how the market is organized, how competition and bargaining determine prices, the role of middlemen, and how specialization is necessary for interdependence. The market day is also a place for socializing. Part swap meet, farmer's market, and al fresco mall one can literally find anything one might need: clothing, shoes, meat market, green grocer, hardware store, livestock exchange, and a notary with a typewriter. Television hadn't reached the mountainous interior of Oaxaca in 1974. So some rural folks were only able to catch up on TV soap operas on their trips to market. At the end of the day the stalls fold up, busses, donkeys and trucks take the vendors away, and the town returns to its hushed zocalo.  
CREDITS
Severo Perez: Cameraman, Co-writer, Editor
Judith Schiffer Perez, ED.D: Co-Producer, Co-Writer
 
BACK TO TOP A typical summertime daily life of the Garcia-Aguilar family is revealed in the farming and household chores, the duties and play of the children, and especially in the making of Monitos (little people), small clay figures the mother, Guillermina, makes to supplement their income.   As the films follows the forming, firing, and painting of clay figures, it also shows the way of life in this small Mexican village in the state of Oaxaca, from obtaining food and water to work and recreation and a trip to the marketplace. Each family member shares the work. The older children help care for the younger and help their mother wash clothes and their father farm. A trip to the market to sell MONITOS shows the way the marketplace has been an important part of rural Mexican life. The film also illustrates how the family unit, its economy, and the skills contribute to their survival.    
CREDITS
Severo Perez: Cameraman, Co-writer, Editor
Judith Schiffer Perez, ED.D: Co-Producer, Co-Writer, Still Photographer
Scott Dailey: Music Composer
 


Juan and Adela Barrientos, a Mexican-American couple, tell how they came from Mexico to Texas with their two young children and earned their livelihood by the family trade of piñata making. As they reminisce about their life, Juan is shown cutting and shaping the piñata's bamboo frame and Maria is seen decorating the frame with colorful paper. The finished piñatas take form as colorful stars, airplanes, boats, and popular cartoon characters. Piñatas have become popular at all kinds of celebrations throughout the United States. The piñata's life is short, however. Children will take turns putting on a blindfold and trying to break the piñata with a stick to get to the candies and toys inside.     
   
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CREDITS
Severo Perez: Director
Judith Schiffer Perez, ED.D: Co-Producer, Co-Writer
Marcos Loya: Music Composer
Carlos Rene Perez: Director of Photography and still Photographer
 
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